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“I’m a junior at University of Northwestern St.Paul. 15 family members before me came to Northwestern. I had been going there for years, going to concerts. It became like a second home I guess. I enjoyed the campus. Had a couple friends from church that were going there. I’m in my first term of nursing school now. It’s really busy. Lots of clinical hours, shadowing experiences that I’ve loved and enjoyed, but no sleep. No sleep at all.”
“I already knew what I wanted to do by my sophomore year of high school—I was 15 or 16. The reason why I chose nursing was because my grandma was in a transitional care unit after a knee replacement. I just spent time with her and kind of helped her around the room. I talked with her and her roommate and spent time and I just kind of…my heart kinda fell for them.”

“I chose Arthur’s, and ACR in general because I needed experience—I wanted experience. A job was good to have. I needed money, but I wanted to work somewhere that I had heard a lot of great things about, about the environment, and that it was kind of a college-aged job—that it was good for college kids with really weird schedules and that it’d be flexible. It seems like everyone works at ACR. ACR is kind of the place to work. It’s fun being an on-campus recruiter, just in passing you just kind of bring up your job non-chalantly, like “you need a job?” I kind of advertise it as a ministry opportunity as well, especially for kids at Northwestern. It’s more than just a job. It’s being able to love on people. I’ve referred…I’ll have to count now…like 6-7 people. Money in the bank. Fat stacks.”

“What I love about my residents is their uniqueness and the variety, I guess, that they bring to each shift. Their funny mannerisms, small quirks, the way that they can be themselves one day and then show you a whole new side the next. It keeps me on my toes and it gives me plenty of opportunities to change how I act, behave and speak to meet them where they need me. Every day that I work I get the opportunity to advocate and care for my residents, and every day they teach me things like patience, critical thinking, and to love unconditionally.”